Repurposing Ideas, Repurposed Furniture Ideas - DIYInspired.com
29th Oct2013

Vintage Wood Letterpress Tray Table

by Dinah Wulf

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I am always honored to share the amazing creativeness of Loren from Pandora’s Craft Box.  I have shared several of her projects in the past, including two of my favorites, her Repurposed Vintage Camera and her beautifully Upcycled Upholstered Chair.  Today, I am sharing an industrial chic Vintage Wood Letterpress Tray Table she made.

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Loren purchased this vintage wood letterpress drawer printer’s tray shadow box over a year ago on ebay.  She decided to turn it into a table with iron hairpin legs she also bought from ebay. I really need to check out the deals on ebay!  She loved the idea of storing little vintage items that she has collected through her travels to antique stores.

She decided to install poster frame plexiglass on each section of the vintage wood letterpress drawer printer tray. She used scissors to carefully cut it to fit each section.

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She bought the hinges from graphic 45 line that can be found at Aaron bothers. The hinges come with brads which she attached to the plexiglass and then nailed the hinges and attached them to the wooden letterpress tray.  She also added hitch fasteners to act as a door handle to each section of the letterpress printer tray.

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You can see Loren’s full tutorial along with more photos on her blog, Pandora’s Craft Box.  You can also follow her on FacebookTwitter, and Pinterest.  Thank you so much Loren for allowing me to share this fantastic project!  You are amazing and inspire me every day with your unique style and creative eye.

23rd Oct2013

Repurposed Earring Burlap and Feather Napkin Rings

by Dinah Wulf

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Since I got a little taste of my glittery and “bling-ed” out Halloween, I thought I’d definitely want to bring a little glitz and glam to my dinner table this year for Thanksgiving.  I guess you could call it rustic chic!  Plus, I love burlap crafts. I found some sparkly earrings in my closet and thought I would make Repurposed Earring Burlap and Feather Napkin Rings.

You only need 3 things:

  • Earrings of choice, one per napkin ring
  • Burlap strips
  • Scissors

Here are the earrings I found. I think it’s been close to a decade since I’ve worn them… yikes! Dangly rhinestone earrings MUST have been in!

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I went to Joann Fabrics and Crafts and found these fun blue feathers in the floral section.

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I gave them a little bend and they were the perfect size for napkin rings.

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First I folded my cloth napkins and wrapped a strip of burlap around it.  I didn’t secure it in any way.

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The feather wraps nicely around the burlap and keeps it in place.  This will also make it easy for your guests to take off when they are ready to use them. Next, I simply pierced the earring through the burlap and out the backing on the earring to keep it on.  This way, you won’t ruin your earrings and you can still wear them…that s if they are still in style!

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I thought they turned out cute!  They are definitely the inspiration for my whole Thanksgiving table scape… now for the centerpieces!

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10th Oct2013

Recycled Book Page Wreath Tutorial

by Dinah Wulf

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This recycled book page wreath tutorial was an oldie but goodie trash to treasure idea.  I wanted to re-share it because I thought it may have gotten lost in the mix of over 600 posts I’ve published and I thought it was a fun book page craft! I had a damaged antique book with beautiful gold leafed pages.  The book is a book of poems by Keats, however it is falling apart and some pages are missing, so I decided to upcycle it into a wreath and turn it from trash to treasure.

Here is what you need:

  • Plumbing Insulation Tube
  • Scissors
  • Duct Tape
  • Book
  • Glue Gun and Glue Sticks
  • Sharp Knife

Instructions:

Start by cutting the plumbing insulation tube in half (one tube makes two wreaths).  Set aside one tube for another project. Carefully and gradually peel away the adhesive strip and stick the two sides together.  I say “carefully and gradually” because this sucker’s extremely sticky.  Next, tape the two ends together with duct tape. If you pinch and massage the tube, it will form into a circle and end up looking like this.

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Next, cut your pages out of the book.  I found that the fastest and cleanest way is to use a sharp knife. One by one, roll each page to make a cone shape and flatten the bottom part.

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Using a hot glue gun, glue the cones onto the foam wreath. After your first layer, turn the wreath over.  You have just finished the back of the wreath. I used approximately 35 pages for the first layer. Start your second layer. For the third, fourth, and fifth layer, you will glue the cone over the ring as shown below.  After the fifth layer, “QC” your wreath and fill any open gaps with another cone.

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Here are some after pictures.

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01st Oct2013

Repurposing to Reuse

by Dinah Wulf

Repurposing to Reuse is written by Guest Author, Keith Hamilton

We’ve started recycling all paper, plastic, cans and glass, but what about other things that may be broken or out of style? Most garbage stays in a landfill for about 30 years. Also, there is no current study, but in 1975 the National Academy of Scientists estimated 14 billion pounds of trash are dumped into the ocean every year. We should be recycling, repurposing or reusing as much as we possibly can.

In 1995, over 200 of the world’s landfills were full. Can you imagine what it will be like when our children and grandchildren are grown? Each person throws away approximately four pounds of garbage every day. Where is it all going to go? Plastics and aluminum can take up to 500 years to break down, according to DoSomething.org. Organic materials, cotton, rags and paper take 6 months to completely break down. Why wouldn’t we try to reuse the things that are reusable?

When it comes to getting rid of large items, clothing or books, thrift stores are helpful resources. But what if we kept those things that we didn’t want, only to repurpose them? We’ve all browsed Pinterest and have seen wonderful craft ideas for things that we would normally throw away, but what if we actually turned those things into other usable items that we would otherwise have to purchase? You can search websites for unlimited repurpose ideas, or even start an eco-craft blog of your own. All you’d need is a wordpress site and a DSL.com connection. There are so many ways to keep from throwing away old things and buying new. At least 75 percent of waste can be recycled or repurposed, according to GreenWaste.com. Experiment with your old stuff before throwing it away.

One great idea that I love the most is using an old door or window and turning them into something else that is shabby chic and completely adorable, found on designbykelli.com. You could lay a piece of custom cut glass over an old door and attach legs to make it into a cool coffee table. You could also have a mirror put into a cut-out on the door and create a full length mirror that is not only useful, but very cool, too. You could create a headboard or a bench with almost no effort at all. An old rustic window can be turned into a mirror, picture frames, or something artistic. Anyone can turn a door or an old window into any beautiful piece of art or décor.

Photo of a repurposed door to hold a guitar by Juhana Leinonen via Flickr

If you ever come across a yard sale or your grandma’s attic and find an old vintage suitcase, grab it! You can do some really interesting and unusual things with old suitcases. If the outside is sturdy, you can attack legs and create a foot stool if it’s rounded or a side table if it’s flat. Another cool thing to make with an old suitcase is a medicine cabinet. You would have to cut into your wall in order to fit the case in, and then add small shelves once the cabinet is up. Attach a pretty mirror to the outside and you’ll have a unique addition to your bathroom. If the shape is difficult to work with and you aren’t able to create furniture with your old suitcase, clean out the inside and attach an accordion file folder to store your personal papers and other keepsakes.

Photo of an upcycled suitcase by Stacie Stacie Stacie via Flickr

Old books can be turned into small individual bookshelves by adding a bracket to the back cover and attaching it to the wall. These cute “book shelves” are a great place to put knick knacks or small picture frames. You can put up a few, or make a wall full of these individualized shelves.

Photo of a bookshelf by 2Tales via Flickr

If you have old vintage tennis rackets, take the strings out and replace the head with a mirror or glass for a picture frame then hang it on your wall, which can be found by typing in Tennis Racket Mirror on CountryLiving.com.

A vintage bicycle, suggests pixadus, can be made into a small table by attaching a piece of wood to the handle bars and the level seat. Place it on your front porch or garden and make planters out of the basket, the seat, the fenders and the handle bars. Then add your own favorite flowers to create a sweet and fun conversation piece.

Photo of a vintage bike in a garden by gamppart via Flickr

About Keith Hamilton

Keith is a blogger who enjoys writing about home improvement and DIY projects.

11th Sep2013

Architectural Salvage Shopping

by Dinah Wulf

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Last weekend, my husband and I decided to do some shopping at our favorite architectural salvage places in Los Angeles.  We had just finished our floors (here are our floors before) and now we needed to look for some new pieces to fit our updates.  I just wanted to share with you what I saw and found.

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Every time I go to places like these, I forget how amazing they are!  We started off at one location of Olde Good Things (we ended at the other location). We ended up going to four different places.

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Our style is, I guess you can call it, “industrial chic”.  We both like the hardness of metal mixed with beautifully upholstered furniture.  It’s a mix of both masculine and feminine and I think that style goes well with our new cement floors (post coming soon!).

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Specifically we were looking for a dining room table.  We found several ideas for legs, table tops, and bases.  We particularly loved these metal legs from vintage machinery but they were out of our budget.  They were about $1100 for a pair… and we still needed to make a top!

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We fell in love with this metal work bench and we were able to negotiate the price down.  We have a large piece of glass that would look beautiful for the top.

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There were aisles and aisles of amazing pieces… everything from fixtures, to statues, to old doors and metal tiles.

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I fell in love with this eight foot by four foot mirror.  Again we haggled with the price and were satisfied with what we got.

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I thought these vintage dress forms were neat and would be great in my craft room.

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There were several cool metal chairs.

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Here are a few more photos.

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Amazing right??? I could spend HOURS in there. We are already planning our next trip!

30th Aug2013

Five Dollar Thrift Store Ottoman Makeover

by Dinah Wulf

I can’t believe that I found this ottoman on a recent thrift store shopping mission for five dollars! It was the perfect trash to treasure project. I couldn’t wait to get it home to get started on my makeover.  Now, this post is more than a simple ottoman makeover, because there was one EXTREMELY annoying issue I had while trying to take it apart.

Materials:

  • Drop cloth
  • Sander and sand paper
  • Clean rags
  • Spray paint
  • Fabric
  • Scissors
  • Pliers
  • Staple gun and staples

Here is what the ottoman looked like BEFORE.  The fabric was damaged at the top and the legs and several nicks and scratches.

 

I turned it over to find that it would be easy to recover (do this before you buy it at the store).

One by one I pulled out what seemed like hundreds on staples.

Here is what it looked like underneath.  Initially I was excited because it looked like it was going to be a quick and easy project. Next, at this point (I thought) all I needed to do was unscrew the top from the base and I can get to reupholster the cushion… WRONG!

I could NOT get the fourth and final screw out of this thing! I tried unscrewing it with a manual screw driver as well as a drill. I tried using a socket wrench. I even went to Home Depot and bought a screw extractor and THAT didn’t work.  I ended up drilling around the hole and manually pulling t out with pliers.

I mean, look at it! Yikes!

And look at the giant hole! Oooops! BUT I got the sucker out.  I figured it will be covered anyway and there are other areas where I can drill a new screw in.

Finally I was able to remove the top from the base. I first took the base and sanded it with an electric sander.  You can see all the nicks and scratches.

After I wiped down the base with a clean rag to remove all the dust and debris, I spray painted it using a brushed metallic spray paint in an oil bronze finish.  I wish I could capture the color better in the pictures, but it turned out great.

While the paint was drying I simply recovered the cushion in a more updated burlap printed fabric using a staple gun.  It was super easy.

Once the base was dry, I screwed in the top to the base with four new wood screws and reused the black cover and staple it in for a finished look underneath.  Here is an AFTER.

27th Aug2013

DIY Thrift Store Pedestal Trays

by Dinah Wulf

I was recently sent on a FANTASTIC thrift store shopping mission by one of my sponsors.  I had the BEST TIME and bought some great, and more importantly, CHEAP stuff!  I made a stenciled craft storage jar out of a cookie jar and a little ceramic quail I found and I also made these fun thrift store pedestal trays out of candlesticks and plates.

Now, I have done similar projects like this in the past like a DIY Cupcake Stand which was awesome for a cupcake bar for my daughters second birthday and a diaper cake display for a golf themed baby shower I did. I also made an Easy Pedestal Bowl that I use as a jewelry holder.

Here are the pieces I found at Goodwill.

I just LOVED the shape of these glass candlesticks.

And look! They fit perfectly together!

E6000 is a go-to for me on projects like this.

I carefully spread it around the top of the candlestick and I placed in the center of the plate.

I let them dry for a full 24 hours before I used them.

I put one in my bathroom for when I take off my jewelry.

And I put the other one in my craft room.

This is such a fun and EASY project that you can do with just about any plate, tray, candlestick, jar, or glass.  The look and shape of the endless combinations can fit any décor style as well!

22nd Aug2013

Upcycled Ladder Garden Display

by Dinah Wulf

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I’m excited to share another great submission by one of my favorite DIY Inspired readers, Lilly Meehan from Ventura California.  Lilly is no stranger to DIY projects.  She has submitted some great ones in the past.  This time she shares a fun and vibrant upcycled ladder that she uses outside for a succulent display.  She chose to paint it an eye-catching purple.  I think she did a fabulous job!

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Here’s what Lilly said about this project:

“An old ladder that was used in my Dad’s contracting business had become too rickety to use safely. After adding plywood shelves and carefully preserving the V & L stencil (the name of my Dad’s business) it was painted in exterior latex paint, plus sprayed with a coat of clear gloss.  The shelves were tied down with twine.  Colorful pots were planted with a variety of succulents with polished stones covering any exposed potting soil.  A new piece of yard art, with the sentimental value of being from my Dad’s business, is now the home of a beautiful succulent garden.”      

More Original Projects by Lilly on DIY Inspired

Thrift Store Chair Makeover

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Upcycled Penny Table

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Recycled Clock Watch Display

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I wanted to give a big THANK YOU to Lilly for allowing me to post this amazing succulent garden. It’s always an honor to share your projects!  Keep ‘em coming!

Do you have a project you’d like to share?  Submit your DIY Projects or crafts for a chance to be featured on DIYInspired.com!

09th Aug2013

Repurposed Vintage Camera Table Lamps

by Dinah Wulf

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I am honored today to feature these two gorgeous Repurposed Vintage Camera Table Lamps by Loren from Pandora’s Craft Box. Can you believe she made this out of a vintage camera and a candlestick? With a lamp rewiring kit and some great Ebay finds she made two unique table lamps. 

Loren said that although it may not look easy, this is a fairly simple DIY project you can take on over the weekend.  She followed the directions from the lamp kit and with the help of the World Wide Web she was able to figure out how to disassemble each camera.  By simply adding a bolt to the inside of the camera, she was able to screw it into the wooden tripod after she removed the candle top plate.  To stabilize the camera she added washers to the bottoms and the tops of each camera.  She found that an Edison bulb fit perfectly and snuggly into the lens of each camera without additional support.

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Loren also has some tips for shopping for these items on Ebay.  She suggests that when you look for the cameras, do not look for cameras in perfect working condition.  Rather, purchase a camera being sold as parts since you will be disassembling it anyway.  This will save you a lot of time and money.

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Amazing! You can see Loren’s full tutorial along with more photos on her blog, Pandora’s Craft Box.  You can also follow her on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.  Thank you so much Loren for allowing me to share this fantastic project!  It’s probably the best out of many greats you have done to date!

15th Jul2013

Recycled Pallet Table Project

by Dinah Wulf

Recycled Pallet Table Project, Written By: Robert Bridgman

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If you’re like me you can’t stand to see anything go to waste: food leftovers, outgrown clothes, or wood scraps. That’s why I knew as soon as I saw it that this recycled pallet table project was perfect for me.  Even in our high-tech times, the majority of goods are still shipped on simple wooden pallets. After one or two uses pallets go to the junk heap. So, making this table keeps pallets out of landfills.  You can find pallets wherever retailers or businesses get goods in bulk. Choose pallets that have “HT” stamped on them; they are treated with heat, rather than chemicals, so are safer to use.

Materials You Will Need

  • You will need one pallet 100 x 100cm and another pallet 120 x 100cm. Take the second pallet, the larger one, apart.
  • For the top you need one 100 x 100 cm piece of tempered safety glass.
  • You will also need four meters of timber 2 x 2.
  • Plus, you’ll need 76 wood screws 5 x 60mm, and paint.

Here’s What to Do

From the pallet slats cut eight pieces 70 x 660mm for the legs. Why eight pieces? Because you are going to use two pieces for each leg.  From the timber cut one piece 70 x 680mm for the frame and eight pieces 320mm at a 45-degree angle for braces. (By the way, if you don’t have a saw, many hardware stores will cut the wood for you for a small fee.)

Then, piece the table frame together, as you see in this picture: 

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Now screw the legs to the frame, like the pictures below show: 

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Then add the braces, like this: 

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Finally screw the legs and frame onto the 100 x 100cm pallet and turn it upright, as in this photo: 

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Sand the wood and paint it to go with your décor. Then top it with the glass and you’ve got a fabulous, fun table. With a success like this I’m ready to make pallet chairs—how about you? 

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About Robert:

Robert writes on behalf of Bridgman, suppliers of luxury furniture. He writes about all things home & garden, lifestyle and DIY. When not writing, Robert can be found travelling or studying Psychology. For updates you can follow him on or on Twitter.

There was no monetary compensation received for this post.

17th Jun2013

Repurposed Kids Play Kitchen Hutch

by Dinah Wulf

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I had yet ANOTHER successful trip to the Goodwill!  I found this old red and white play hutch that I thought was too cute to pass up for $9.99.  I knew I needed to hunt for a second piece to complete this repurposed kids play kitchen hutch I had in my head.  It just so happens that my best friend was storing an old wooden vanity table in my garage… and guess what? She said I could have it…FOR FREE!!! So, here’s what I ended up doing with these two fab pieces.

Materials I used:

  • Old kids play hutch and kids table
  • Electric sander
  • Spray paint
  • Drop cloth
  • Fabric
  • Scissors
  • Spray adhesive
  • Ruler
  • Pencil
  • Painter’s tape
  • Paint
  • Wooden knobs (3)
  • E6000

Here is the hutch BEFORE. It had painted drawers and little flowers on it.  It’s a little scratched and warped on the bottom but for ten bucks, I was OK with that!

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Here is the vanity table BEFORE.  This was caked with paint.

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Both were pretty beat up so I had to break out the electric sander.  The table had survived two previous makeovers.

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I spray painted both of them white.

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I measured and cut three pieces of fabric to fit the three bottom shelves.  I had fabric left over from the little upholstered stool I made over.

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I attached the fabric strips to the hutch with spray adhesive.

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Next, I liked the fake drawers that the hutch had originally, so I taped off three drawers and painted them blue (of course).  

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I added little knobs that I had left from an old dresser I upcycled a while ago. Since the bottom of the hutch was hollow and the way the hutch and table aligned, I had to use an industrial strength E6000 glue to attach the two together.

Here are a few AFTER photos. I love that it matches the repurposed toy storage stuffed animal cage I made and the upcycled play table I painted.

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12th Jun2013

Amazing Repurposed Rubber Tires

by Dinah Wulf

Rubber tires are so problematic to landfills that 11 U.S. states ban tires from landfills, and all but eight states have some sort of restriction on how tires can be disposed. Not only are they slow to degrade, but they also tend to rise to the surface, which causes a problem with landfill covers. In 1990, only 17 percent of Americans’ waste tires were put to better use while the rest filled landfills. Today, the EPA estimates that 80.4 percent of tires can be recycled or repurposed as asphalt, playground covering, fuel — and functional art.

Art Rolls On

Creating sculptures with re-purposed items is all the rage at farmers’ markets and craft shows this year. You can take your old tires and make something that grabs the attention of anyone passing by. Removing the tread is part of the process, known in artistic circles as tire carving, explains lushome.com.

Professional artists have fancy tools to get the job done, but the average DIY project planner can simply use a screwdriver or sharp tool to pull the tread off. This leaves you with a clean rubber canvas. What you do with it is up to you, but the more artistic, the better.

  • Use stencils to paint interesting patterns on the tire.
  • Slice up the sides of the rubber and paint complementary colors bursting out of the tire frame.
  • Pull out the tube and cut it into sections. Fold each piece together and glue them to create eclectic vases.
  • Don’t throw way the tread you remove either – use it as part of the project. Weave strips together to create coverings or cut sections into flower petals or tree fronds for large yard sculptures.

Used Tires

Image from Flickr user Paul Garland

Clever Seating

Forget the old tire swing hanging from a tree. Expand on that concept by creating lawn furniture that will get your neighbors talking. The key to making a tire chair is building on a strong base.

Repurpose

Photo from Flickr user suvajack

Slice the tire in strips, for instance, and use the tread as a decorative edge for an old, beat-up patio chair. Try a weave or patchwork pattern out of the rubber to replace torn seating. Redecorate an ugly metal chair with something that says you are not only stylish but practical.

Add an ottoman to the tire chair to create a full seating arrangement. This is a sensible way to reuse motorcycle tires. Cut two pieces of plywood to cover the top and bottom of a tire and then attach them with screws. Now, glue rope over the outside edge and create a circle pattern on the boards. Screw in furniture legs, and you have a faux wicker-style ottoman, explains recycledawblog.com.

The Blooming Planter

Tires have made suitable planters for years, but you’ve never seen blooming tires like these. Clean your tires with an environmentally friendly de-greaser and then put them into place in the yard or garden.

Planters made from tires, metal

Image from Flickr user creativedc

Take a coffee cup, or anything with a round edge, and draw chalk circles on top of the tire to create petals. Using a sharp utility knife, you will cut around the inner edge of the circles – this is the section facing the opening of the tire. Pull back on the rubber to flip your petals outward and create a blooming flower. Now just paint it a bright color and fill the tire with something green. Thank you wuvie.net.

Repurposing allows you to take what once was litter and make it into something unique. Instead of tossing the old tires, turn them into a masterpiece using your hands and a little imagination.

Tire planters in Amite, LA

Photo from Flickr user shawnzrossi

18th Mar2013

Stuffed Animal Toy Storage

by Dinah Wulf

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Today I had to share my obsession with reuse and repurposing… either that or I’m a hoarder I haven’t quite figured that out yet or at least come to terms with “hoarding”.  I turned literal trash into a centerpiece and then into stuffed animal toy storage.  Yeah I know. I have issues.

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I originally found this plant hanger next to the trash by the side of our house when we first moved in last year.  I ended up cleaning it up, painting it, embellishing it, and using it as an outdoor chandelier for my daughter’s outdoor summer birthday party.  It was hung in the center of a tent with a nice adult seating area and turned out quite lovely.

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I didn’t want to throw it away so I ended up hanging it in my daughter’s room for stuffed animal toy storage.  It worked out perfectly because it matched the butterfly wall art, stenciled burlap butterfly wall art, I made and ceiling fan that I installed.  Since I used the pearls and beads sparingly when decorating the chandelier, small stuffed animals can easily be taken in and out.  My daughter loves it and calls it her hanging zoo (and sometimes her hanging jail, but zoo is much nicer).

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When I first saw that pile of unwanted trash, I would have never thought I’d be hanging it in my toddler’s room, but it worked out!  This old plant hanger, once dirty and trashy, is now a sweet treasure that I think my daughter will have for several years to come.

07th Mar2013

Repurposed Vintage Door Knobs

by Dinah Wulf

One of my favorite things to do on the weekend is peruse vintage flea markets.  I have noticed that you can find vintage door knobs in abundance and for a decent price.  They come in various colors and styles and in in different materials like glass and metal as well.  Sometimes you can even find the original matching door knob plate.  I thought I’d put together some ideas for repurposing vintage door knobs.  The more patina there is, the more beautiful and unique the project.  Here are seven fantastic inspirations for repurposed vintage door knobs.

This is a vintage glass door knob photo holder from Etsy shop, RustiqueArt.

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Here is another clever and fun idea for a photo holder.

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I love the idea of using a pretty glass door knob as a curtain tie back.

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Here is a cute idea from Restoring the Roost in which she made a useful door knob hanger for aprons in her kitchen.  She also suggests this for hanging coats in your mudroom.

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I love this similar idea for a door knob coat rack using salvaged wood.  It doubles as a pretty art piece as well.

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A great way to display and organize jewelry, here is a door knob necklace holder.

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This may be one of my favorites and one I may have to steal!  I like this idea of using the door knob and the plates for holding towels in your bathroom from Not Just a Housewife.

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I hope you enjoyed these fun ideas.  Can you think of more creative ways to repurpose a door knob?